About us

Finnegaarden was named after the Finne farm in Voss, and was first mentioned in 1403. In the mid 1700s, part of the farm belonged to Erik Rosenkrantz. Following the fire in 1702, Finnegaarden became the Hanseatic Office's southernmost farm. For a prolonged period, the farm fell under Hamburg ownership. In the mid 1800s the Lude Family became the owners of Finnegaarden, and the farm currently belongs to Agnethe Lude Sande.

Finnegaarden has been built as a Hanseatic Trading House. In earlier times, there was a brisk trade in dried fish, corn, leather and hides. Over the centuries the farm has been used by German, Dutch and Norwegian merchants as a work place, residence, warehouse and, from time to time, a restaurant.

The Finnegaarden buildings that are a part of Bryggen are inscribed on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites. Following the fire of 1702, the building was rebuilt in 1703. Finnegaarden was first mentioned in Bryggen's history in 1403. Through the ages the building has been used by German, Dutch and Norwegian merchants for trading, as a place of residence, a warehouse and, from time to time, as a restaurant.

Together with the Hanseatic Museum, Finnegaarden is part of Bryggen in Bergen and is inscribed on UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites.

Finnegaarden is a house buzzing with activity! We offer a selection of 3 restaurants, as well as Bergen's most charming hotel. For guests who want to experience something different, something rich in atmosphere, history and culture, Finnegaarden is the natural choice.